Diction – How Important?

This week we’re exploring the art of diction and it’s impact on singing. 

Sometimes the topic of diction is often overlooked in favor of stretching the vocal range or achieving the perfect tone. However, without effective articulation our audience can’t even understand what we’re singing about! This week we’d like to hear your approach to perfect pronunciation & what methods you use to achieve this.

So the question is: How important is diction/pronunciation to successful singing & what exercises and methods can we use to work on it.

Share your views on FaceBook and our Forum!

Great Comments from last week:

Last week Craig asked: Do you think it’s possible to over-practice?

Freya Astrella wrote…

“Yes!! muscles get tired! practice silently or very quietly and save the big stuff. another point is, to ensure conscientious practice else its all a waste of time anyway”.

Luke Bernard commented…

“If you are healthy and rest well no, even aggressive sounds have healthy ways to do them. A baby screams all today and suffers no vocal loss. If we support our voices well and rest we can practice all we want”.

Trent Jacobs posted…

“I don’t think you can do too much Effective Practice, however most of the time when you talk about over-practicing it’s mindless and useless practice so you’re just stressing yourself physically. However, you should over-practice your stuff (practice correctly and mindfully). Basically, don’t practice so that you can play/sing it right; practice so that you CAN’T play/sing it wrong”!

Fantastic comments this week guys, looking forward to hearing from you all next week.

All the best, C x

  • Diane

    I think dictation is very important. The listener can’t connect with your lyrics if they can’t understand them. I’m big on proper grammar in lyric writing too. A friend of mine wrote a lyric “and you’ll stay the same with your bitter and shame” I tried explaining that “bitter” is improper, “bitterness” would be correct, you can BE bitter, but you can’t HAVE bitter. She told me “it’s a country thing”… I’ve still yet to hear a country song with less than 4th grade grammar in it on the radio! The exception to the rule is if a type of dictation or grammar is proper to the genre – for instance “Ya’ll” in country or rap. GRANTED, Bob Dylan was DEFINITELY not the king of dictation- yet his music is timeless, however todays listeners expect much more from music than they did back then. Dictation is one of the reasons “Screamo” has never been mainstream popular. Yes it’s fun to thrash around and rock out, but as a listener matures they seek to connect with the song – you can’t connect with that which you cannot understand.