Improve Your Singing Blogs – 5 Essential Steps

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Answer the questions your audience are pondering…and do your best to keep them dazzled –says Frances Caballo

So, you want to start blogging – you feel it would be a great extension to your singing work.

Starting is easy: start reading bloggers you admire within your niche.

Study how they organize their thoughts and select their images, and observe when and at what time of day they publish.

Although not a singer, writer Nora Ephron was a great blogger. (You can find some of her posts on the Huffington Post.)

BlogText01She spiced her posts with insight, pithy humor, and self-reflection. She wasn’t afraid to admit what she didn’t understand or confess what she didn’t believe, despite someone’s expert opinion.

She knew how to help us smile and even chuckle while being informed.

Her blog was at times as irreverent as the fake orgasm scene she wrote for When Harry Met Sally and that’s why we adored her and loved her blog as well as her screenplays, and books.

So don’t be afraid of being irreverent or deeply honest.

Write about what you think, what you know and what you just discovered. Answer the questions you audience are pondering and do your best to keep them dazzled.

5 Essential Steps to Blogging

If you are new to blogging, these are the essentials you’ll need.

KNotepadCheck01now Your Audience: How well do you know your audience? Do you know the demographics for their age, sex, major language, or country of origin? Once you are certain you understand your audience, write for just one person. Really. Think of one person in your audience and write a post for that one person.


NotepadCheck02Use The Power of Numbers: Use numbers in your blog title. People are more likely to click on a title if it contains numbers— especially odd numbers. Vocal coach Chris Beatty wrote a post titled 4 Vocal Skills That Need Each Other. Aren’t you tempted to find it and read it right now? Try to mimic his skill.


NotepadCheck03Employ Keyword-Rich Blog Titles: Blog titles need to attract attention, have zing, and appeal to a reader’s curiosity. Think about the teasers at the top of newspapers. Their purpose is to entice you to drop some coins into the racks and read the stories below the fold and on the newspaper’s internal pages. Use words to lure your readers in.


NotepadCheck04Liven it Up With Images: Images – great ones – will liven up your page. (In addition, you can use them to pin your blog image to Pinterest and drive traffic back to your blog.) There are a number of websites where you can find images for free including PhotoPin.com, MorgueFile.com, Flickr, and Wikipedia Commons. Select images that quickly convey the message of your posts. If possible, use more than one image to break up the text and offer the eye a break from stacks of black text.


NotepadCheck05 Stick With A Calendar: Develop a plan for your blog content and stick to it. Download SingleMind Free, a mindmapping tool, and use it. Spend an hour to come up with four months or more of blog post topics.


That’s it.

In case you were looking for a few more hints, here is my list of best practices to consider:

• Be consistent in your posting. Decide how often you can reasonably create informative posts and keep to your schedule.

• Promote your blog on every social media network you join.

• Michael Stelzner of Social Media Examiner offers this great tip: Think of yourself as a publisher of an online magazine and write insightful, magazine-style posts.

• Get to know your readers by responding to their comments on your blog, following them on Twitter, and connecting with them on LinkedIn and other social media channels. They will appreciate the attention.

• If your readers have blogs, take time to read some of their posts and leave a comment if you feel so moved.

• Did one of your readers ask a question in her comments? Great! You have a topic for your next blog post.

• Do you have an avid reader who always leaves articulate comments? Ask her or him to write a guest post.

• Always end your blogs with a question to elicit feedback.

-Frances

CaballoBioFrances Caballo is a social media strategist, manager and author of Avoid Social Media Time Suck: A Blueprint for Writers to Create Online Buzz for Their Books and Still Have Time to Write, and Social Media Just for Writers: The Best Online Marketing Tips for Selling Your Books. You can find her on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, and Google+.


  • gilles mongeon

    i’ve come back to music a few months ago…and i play for the chairs as we use to say…the fact is when i have a visit of bars owners who may be interest to hire me it is difficult for me to play the same thing i use to play when there ave customers in the bar….i become shy even with the long experience i have….do you have a suggestion to help me…thanks in advence…

  • Start easy. Sing your “do re mi”s up and down the scales. Start with the C scale, then the C# scale, and on up. Be your own teacher.Get a microphone.Launch a sound recording app on your computer, smart phone, or on the Internet, so you can hear what you sound like.Sing for at least a half an hour a day.

    Jason@VanEman