Top Questions from Vocalists

VoiceCouncil thanks readers for sending in their top questions—the 3 winners are revealed below…

Q’s on Coaching

Singers want coaching on overcoming performance anxiety, developing a “larynx of steel” and pushing forward with their careers.

There were also important questions about increasing range, singing in outdoor environments and how to find a good vocal coach; readers will want to check out Paco and Ujiya’s great comments on dealing with nerves.

While you’re waiting for specific answers you can see all of Leontine’s important contributions at a glance.

Q’s on Technology

We’re really pleased that vocalists did not let the technophile-fears keep them away from asking their questions!

Singers have questions on how technology can help them achieve certain vocal sounds—or just the most reliable ways to produce good, clean vocals with the right level of reverb.

There were also questions about wireless headsets, pitch correction devises and voice/midi issues.

Sneak Peek: Bill Gibson has just written “Technology 101 for Vocalists” exclusively for VoiceCouncil magazine – you’ll find this on the site next week!

Q’s on Health

Singers have specific questions for their doctors – and we are so pleased that we have eminent physician Anthony F. Jahn, MD contributing to the site.

When it comes to health, singers are asking about how to best wake up the morning voice, how to protect the voice from second hand smoke, and the best ways to hydrate.

Other questions included advise about avoiding and recovering from infections and how to test your own hearing without an appointment at an audiologist.

The Winning Questions

Choosing three winners was difficult – and subjective! So, we’ve decided to run many more contests through the year to increase our readers’ chances!

All of the questions were valuable and will be shown to our blogging team – so watch their columns in the coming weeks.

First, many thanks for speaking up for your fellow vocalists: ajenkins, altheamb, bettyjane, Brett Lee, cwhitney, Clifton Thayer, DReed, jodalow, jonbinder, Jorge GF, Kenneth, Kim Butler, leeentertainments, mkc5301, Michael, naturrrgirl, ncarasis, Paco, Paulee Gee, Ray George Baker, Steve Holland, trekjock, Ujiya (Brian)

Now our three winners:

If you have your own answers to these questions or any of the issues raised in the last few weeks, leave a comment in the comments section below.

Winners are asked to email the to receive their prizes.

  • brywool

    Regarding morning voice- a hot shower helps. Also, get a Netti Pot to irrigate the nasal passages and blow all the crud out. You can do this in the shower. Stretching is good. Humming and lip bubbles are also great. It would also be a good idea to have some water in the morning to lubricate the voice.

    My .02

  • kendaldickson

    As for the vocalist that has been singing for a year, you must understand that developing a voice can take many years but is worth the effort. A flat tone is usually caused by not using the singers smile which must be developed. You have to have the energy to lift your voice and be on top of the tone. Many pop singers will smile with their mouth to achieve brightness in their tone. THis is not advisable any notable coach will tell you. Your mouth is not in the the right position for your vowels and other problems. Lift your voice as you smile with your eyes and cheeks but retain correct vowel position with your mouth. You will see this with accomplished singers. THis also produces a more in pitch sound. Remember you must focus your sound right between the eyes. Keep up the practice but remember, practice does not make perfect, only perfect practice can do that. THe vocal endeavor is best when coached by a professional. THere is no one principle but many that need to be mastered. You will see progress and it will be worth it.

  • kendaldickson

    This scares me. Understand that coughing, blowing and stuff like that can stress and even damage vocal cords. Only inward motions are suggested, never outward as in coughing. Some flem on cords is normal. Humming is the best in a light voice slowly through all your range. THen staccatos he… ha… ha are the best exercise to wake up the diaphragm. If you have a tendency of tightening muscles when you sing, tongue and lip exercises are always good. Also breathe in through your nose instead of your mouth as it will warm the air and relax the cords on every breath but takes some practice. Good luck

  • kendaldickson

    As far as punching through I will not approach vocally but technically. SLight increase on 1k to 2 k frequencies will help. A compressor and limiter will help.
    20 htz filter activated on mic channel. Making sure PA is not overdriven with frequencies or adding a sub speaker will help clear up mid range. Using a Voice live 2 will help your vocals sparkle.

  • altheamb

    I am new to this publication and am not certain that I am jumping in in the correct spot, but my question is about the vocalist who has very limited ability on the keyboard, but is able to create song in her head. I want to be able to play and develop my own songs. Is there some kind of technology that will help me to do this. I would need something that would come up with accompaniment chords to the melody that I would play on the keyboard. This may sound stupid, but please be kind in your responses: I really need help here. Thank you very much.

  • ujiya

    Hey There,

    I love your question…I've asked a similar question on this forum before. No one responded, which tells me that you and I may have a very different approach to the voice, technology, and the marriage of those two elements. It's not a stupid question at all and since it's such a fantastic time to be alive, there actually are devices that can help you to bring your music into fruition with the voice, and voice alone. For sake of giving away my secrets…email me personally and I will let you know what I've found. or check out my site:

  • Gary Waight

    looks like voice live 3 would work great